Big Red Soda Announces A Perfect Match Made In Texas – A Partnership With Dallas Pro Football Rookie Taco Charlton

AUSTIN, Texas, June 26, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Big Red, America’s original and best-selling red soda, announces that Taco Charlton, Dallas’ first round pick and 28th overall in the 2017 draft, has signed on to be a brand ambassador for the upcoming football season. Charlton, whose given name is Vidauntae, was nicknamed “Taco” as a child by his mother and grandmother for a still, unclear reason. Now, that moniker could not be more relevant as the rookie defensive end kicks off his professional football career in Texas – home of Big Red and some of the country’s best tacos.

“When Taco was drafted to start his pro football career in the Lone Star state, it made perfect sense to us, a Texas-based company, to combine three things Texans love – football, tacos and Big Red.” says Thomas Oh, SVP of Marketing at Big Red, Inc. “This fall, we are looking forward to supporting Taco in his rookie season and reminding consumers that nothing complements tacos better than the sweet, smooth flavor of Big Red.”
This fall, images of Big Red and Taco Charlton will be found on Big Red soda displays at hundreds of stores across North and South Texas. As part of the promotion, Big Red will host a sweepstakes offering fans the chance to win Big Red football memorabilia autographed by Charlton. Big Red will also host Taco Charlton meet-and-greet sessions at select North Texas grocery stores later this year.

Big Red Soda Announces A Perfect Match Made In Texas – A Partnership With Dallas Pro Football Rookie Taco Charlton

Big Red Soda Announces A Perfect Match Made In Texas – A Partnership With Dallas Pro Football Rookie Taco Charlton

“I love my name and I actually do love tacos,” says Charlton (@TheSupremeTaco). “Although I am new to Texas, I quickly learned that nothing goes better with tacos than Big Red, so I’m excited to partner with such a unique, iconic brand.”

ABOUT BIG RED
Big Red Inc. is one of the top 10 beverage companies in North America with a history dating back to 1937. Along with Big Red®, recognized as the number-one selling red soda, Big Red Inc. also markets beverage brands Big Red Zero®, Big Blue®, Big Peach®, Big Pineapple®, NuGrape®, and Nesbitt’s® products. Distributed widely throughout the Dr Pepper Snapple Group, Independent Bottlers and Pepsi Beverages Company, consumers across the country enjoy Big Red Inc.’s beverages.

The Celtics 76ers have identified a blockbuster deal to exchange top picks

The Boston Celtics and Philadelphia 76ers have officially completed a blockbuster trade that sends the No. 1 overall pick in this week’s NBA draft from Boston to Philadelphia.

The Sixers, who are expected to select Washington guard Markelle Fultz first overall, traded the No. 3 overall pick and a future first-round pick to the Celtics.

On top of its No. 3 overall pick, Philadelphia is also sending the 2018 first-round ‎pick it owns via the Los Angeles Lakers, which the Sixers acquired from Phoenix at the 2015 trade deadline.

But if that Lakers pick doesn’t fall between No. 2 and No. 5 in the 2018 draft, Philadelphia will instead send a 2019 first-rounder to Boston that it acquired from the Sacramento Kings.

“We’re thrilled to be able to select what we expect [to] be an impact player with the third pick in this year’s very talented draft class, while also adding a highly valuable future asset as we continue to build toward Banner 18,” Celtics president of basketball operations Danny Ainge said in a statement.

It will mark the second straight year that Philadelphia selects first overall. The Sixers used the No. 1 pick last year on Ben Simmons, who missed the entire season because of a foot injury.

76ers president of basketball operations Bryan Colangelo said the trade “puts us in the enviable position of selecting first overall in consecutive draft years.”

“History suggests that No. 1 has the greatest odds of producing franchise-level talent, and we are confident that this year’s draft class has that very potential,” Colangelo said. “Thursday night will see us take another significant step toward building a successful and sustainable basketball program.”

Ainge said Monday that he believes the player the Celtics would have selected with the No. 1 on Thursday will be there when the team picks at No. 3.

“I think even before the lottery, we’ve been evaluating these kids for a couple years, and we felt like it was very close with the top handful of players, and we still feel that way,” Ainge said in a conference call Monday after the trade was formally announced. “We think there’s a really good chance the player we’ll take at 3 is the same player we would have taken at 1. So this was a great opportunity to acquire an impactful asset.”

Ainge didn’t rule out the possibility that Boston could use the No. 3 pick in a secondary move but seemed to hint that the team made this initial move simply because it believed it could add a future pick while still getting its desired player.

Celtics fans have been leery about moving down, particularly with all the buzz about Fultz. But Ainge repeatedly stressed that the Celtics are excited about this move.

“We feel like it’s a jump-start for us,” Ainge said. “We’re getting the player we want. They’re getting the player they want. And we’ll get an additional player that we want in next year’s draft, or the year after. So I think it’s a good deal for both teams.”

Ainge noted that Philadelphia’s trade offer was the best Boston received for the No. 1 pick and “by a significant margin.” Ainge also downplayed the suggestion that Boston might have aided what might be its primary Eastern Conference competition down the road and said Boston’s front office was unanimous on the decision to move down.

Tyronn Lue says no major changes for Cavs for Game 3

CLEVELAND — Cavaliers coach Tyronn Lue is digging in his heels on his approach to coaching his team despite trailing the Golden State Warriors 0-2 heading into Wednesday’s Game 3.

Lue announced Tuesday that he will keep J.R. Smith as his starting shooting guard, even though Smith combined for just three points on 1-for-6 shooting, two rebounds and zero assists, steals and blocks in Games 1 and 2.

A Cavs source told ESPN following Game 2 that the team would consider starting Iman Shumpert over Smith after Shumpert had some success guarding Kevin Durant and played aggressively on offense. Lue, however, is sticking with Smith, who started 35 of the 41 games in which he played this season.

Shumpert, who required an IV after Game 2, appeared Tuesday to have recovered from the cramps that plagued him Sunday. He and Smith engaged in a spirited game of 1-on-1 during the portion of the practice that was open to the media and Shumpert could be heard encouraging Smith to bring the same mindset he displayed in practice to the rest of the series.

Lue also remained steadfast in the Cavs playing with a frenetic pace, even though the Warriors have outscored them 245-204 in the series so far. The Cavs were average, at best, in terms of pace during the regular season, ranking 16th in the league.

“I think taking good shots when we’re playing with pace and not turning the basketball over, letting them get out in transition,” Lue said. “So, that’s our game. We’re not going to change our game because of who we’re playing. And I’m confident that we can play that way, and we did it last year. A lot of people said we couldn’t. But that’s our game. That’s who we are. And we’re not going to change just pause we’re playing Golden State.”

The Cavs are playing at a quicker pace than LeBron James has ever played before. James has played with an average pace of 90.6 possessions per game in his 14-year career, according to ESPN Stats & Information. In the Finals, the Cavs are averaging 105.5 possessions per game so far.

In the first quarter of Game 2, the Cavs played with the fastest pace of any quarter of the 1,275 games James has played — regular season or postesason. Despite the extra possessions, Cleveland trailed 40-34 heading into the second. The quickened pace was not sustainable in Game 2, as the Cavs had 59 possessions in the first half and 49 possessions in the second half.

James rejected a reporter’s call for more of a halfcourt-oriented game from the Cavs on Wednesday.

“That’s not our game. We don’t play slowdown basketball,” James said. “We play at our pace. We play our game. We got to this point playing our way. We have won a lot of games playing the way we play, so we’re not going to change.”

Lue acknowledged one adjustment, saying that starting center Tristan Thompson could continue to play reduced minutes.

“It’s not anything Tristan isn’t doing,” Lue said. “I just think that against this team you have to score the basketball.”

If it’s not Thompson, the Cavs will likely go more to Channing Frye, who was 1-for-5 for two points in Game 2. He is not the only role player struggling. Smith, of course, has yet to make an impact, and Deron Williams is 0-for-9 in the Finals so far.

“We have done a great job of getting everyone involved and making sure that everyone feels comfortable, but now we need everything and everybody,” Kyrie Irving said. “And I know they know how important they are. And it’s our job, my job to exude as much confidence as I can in them in order to get the very best, and I will do that.”

Preds coach Peter Laviolette refuses to discuss possible goalie change

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Predators coach Peter Laviolette is giving no hint of whether goaltender Pekka Rinne will start in a pivotal Game 3 against Pittsburgh on Saturday night.

Laviolette pulled Rinne for Juuse Saros after the Predators gave up three goals in the first 3:28 of the third period Wednesday night. Pittsburgh finished off a 4-1 win for a 2-0 lead in the Stanley Cup Final.

Asked Thursday if he has made a decision for Game 3, Laviolette said he will not talk about lineup changes. Laviolette said the goalies know who will start, although the Predators’ public relations department clarified that neither Rinne nor Saros knows who will start Game 3, according to TSN.

Rinne went into the final with the stingiest numbers in net this postseason, and he is a favorite to win the Conn Smythe trophy as postseason MVP. The 34-year-old goalie has instead given up eight goals on 36 shots through two games. Two goals went off teammates and into the net, but it has not been the inspiring performance that the Predators and their fans are used to from the big Finn.

His save percentage has dipped throughout the playoffs — .976 against Chicago, then .932 against St. Louis and .925 in the West finals against Anaheim. Against the quick-strike Penguins, it’s just .778.

Still, the three-time Vezina Trophy finalist has allowed only 13 goals in eight playoff games at home and his teammates vowed to play better defense.

“It’s not his fault by any means,” Nashville captain Mike Fisher said of the goals allowed in Pittsburgh. “We know we can do a better job in front of him. It’s a team game, and everyone looks at shots and save percentage but forget about the quality and who we’re playing. And certain parts of the game where we got to help him out.”

Defenseman Ryan Ellis, who has played with Rinne for six years, called the goalie Nashville’s best player, night in and night out.

“There’s nothing that can replace Peks,” Ellis said.